Chianti Castello del Tegolato
De Grote Hamersma
De Grote Hamersma 8.5

Chianti DOCG

 11,95

“Everyone knows cabernet and merlot, but sangiovese… Can you imagine how unknown you are as a canaiolo, Even many an avid chianti lover does not know this Tuscan grape.

Now frankly, it’s not that strange either. Although it is ancient grape, mentioned as early as 1303 in Tuscany, it is not an outlier. Canaiolo does not fare so well on its own. Not interesting enough to make good wine on its own, at most as an auxiliary to the fancy sangiovese. He adds some softness, no special scents or flavors.

So when after phylloxera, the phylloxera plague in the middle, late 19th century, replanting was required, canaiolo was forgotten.

But here and there there is quite a bit of it, so those who have it in the vineyard anyway, put it in the wine. Also, as mentioned, to give some softness. And that works. A very classic chianti, this one, and in the good sense of the word. Fine red fruit and sunny autumnal aromas from the sangiovese, and lots of ripe fruit and soft tannins from the canaiolo…”

– Hammersmith (2022)

About the wine

Winery: Antico Castello di Poppiano
Wine: Chianti
Classification: DOCG
Grape variety: Sangiovese, Canaiolo
Region/Area: Chianti (Tuscany)
Type: Dry red wine
Soil: Clay limestone with rocks (Alberese and Galestro)
Harvest: 2018
Alcohol: 14.5%
Closure: Cork
Serving temperature: 18-20° C
Lay-up potential: No data available yet
Content: 0.75L

Vinification

Once fully matured, the grapes are harvested entirely by hand and undergo maceration in contact with the skins.

Colour

The Chianti “Castello del Tegolato” has a bright and ruby red color

Odor

In the nose it has intense wine aromas with a slight hint of violet.

Taste impression

Antico Castello di Poppiano’s Chianti has a delicateflavor with light tannins: Full, soft and harmonious.

Culinary advice

This wine goes well with meat dishes and mild cheeses.

Awards

De Grote Hamersma

De Grote Hamersma 8.5

Tasting Notes

“Everyone knows cabernet and merlot, but sangiovese… Can you imagine how unknown you are as a canaiolo, Even many an avid chianti lover does not know this Tuscan grape.

Now frankly, it’s not that strange either. Although it is ancient grape, mentioned as early as 1303 in Tuscany, it is not an outlier. Canaiolo does not fare so well on its own. Not interesting enough to make good wine on its own, at most as an auxiliary to the fancy sangiovese. He adds some softness, no special scents or flavors.

So when, after phylloxera, the phylloxera plague in the middle, late 19th century, replanting was required, canaiolo was forgotten.

But here and there there is quite a bit of it, so those who do have it in the vineyard put it in the wine. Also, as mentioned, to give some softness. And that works. A very classic chianti, this one, and in the good sense of the word. Fine red fruit and sunny autumnal aromas from the sangiovese, and lots of ripe fruit and soft tannins from the canaiolo…”

– Hammersmith (2022)

OTHER SUGGESTIONS…

Chianti “Forramoro” D.O.C.G.

 14,95

Out of stock

Tegolato I.G.T.

 79,95

9 Anime I.G.T.

 44,95

Sign up for our newsletter

Stay informed about our latest wines & wine tastings.

We gebruiken cookies om ervoor te zorgen dat onze site zo soepel mogelijk draait. Als je doorgaat met het gebruiken van deze site, gaan we ervan uit dat je ermee instemt.